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HSN in the News

Publication: Dermatology Times

Back in 2013 Adult & Pediatric Dermatology of Concord, Massachusetts, was hit with a $150,000 HIPAA fine for an unencrypted thumb drive that stored more than 2,200 patient records and was stolen from a staff member’s car. Not only did the dermatology group owe the hefty sum, it joined the ranks of healthcare providers listed on the Wall of Shame where security breaches are reported by the Department of Health and Human Services Department’s (HHS) Office of Civil Rights (OCR). OCR even issued a news release calling out APDerm’s violation of the HIPAA Privacy, Security and Breach Notification Rules.

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Publication: Dermatology Times

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) pulls no punches when it warns healthcare providers that meaningful use audits are happening, at random, and consequences for failing the audit are costly. If a provider cannot produce documentation that fully supports its electronic health record (EHR) attestation, the CMS could recoup incentive payments.

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Publication: InformationWeek

A Saturday night phone call gave no indication it heralded months of bureaucracy, finger pointing, expense — and the dismal realization that even the smallest healthcare provider is liable and harmed when a business associate suffers a HIPAA breach.

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Publication: EMR & HIPAA

Ask any medical professional about their biggest concern for protecting patient information and they will probably tell you about the threat of a random audit conducted by the Office of Civil Rights (OCR). OCR is tasked with enforcing HIPAA regulations and has the ability to hand out fines up to $1.5 million per violation for a HIPAA breach and failing to comply with HIPAA regulations.

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Publication: Medical Practice Insider

Try as they may, small practices are having a hard time running HIPAA’s gamut between compliance and security.Of course, when the source material is so dense and with technical support hard to come by, who could blame them? Certainly not Art Gross.

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Publication: Physicians Practice

Patients prefer it. Medicare’s meaningful use program requires it. And within a few years, health information technology analysts predict that electronic communication will be par for the course in delivering patient care. Indeed, mobile devices and Web-based technology have provided new platforms to market your practice, transmit medical records, consult with other physicians, and maintain closer contact with patients, which are linked to better outcomes. But it also opens the door to privacy and security risks.

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Publication: EMR & HIPAA

It’s one thing to have a laptop stolen with 8,000 patient records or for a disgruntled doctor to grab his patients’ records and start his own practice.  It’s another when the Cosa Nostra steals that information, siphons money from the patient’s bank account and turns it into a patient trafficking crime ring.  Welcome to organized crime in the age of big data.

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Publication: InformationWeek

As office manager of the Fertility Institute of Virginia, Pattie Carson needed to ensure the practice was compliant with laws related to mobile usage, emails, and security. But keeping up with changing laws while running the busy reproductive endocrinology practice was impractical, if not impossible.

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Publication: Recovery Zone

It’s important for MSPs to understand what HIPAA compliance is, what they can do to be HIPAA compliant, and what might happen if they try to service clients in the medical field without being HIPAA compliant. Luckily, our friend Guy Baroan, expert MSP and owner of IT solutions provider Baroan Technologies, knows his way around HIPAA. Guy explained that a number of clients are medical practices with data that falls under HIPAA compliance standards, which means he’s got to have the necessary security and business practices in place to make sure these standards are met.

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